Hofstra Pulse Magazine

Huntington Local Ken Springer Remembers Hurricane Sandy at Long Beach Boardwalk

Ken Springer has seen it all from his beach chair under the Long Beach Boardwalk.

By Carson Olivares

Ken Springer, 69, eats his caesar salad and chocolate chip cookie under the Long Beach Boardwalk every Saturday. Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

Ken Springer, 69, eats his caesar salad and chocolate chip cookie under the Long Beach Boardwalk every Saturday.
Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

Ken Springer, 69, of Huntington, eats his regular caesar salad and chocolate chip cookie under the dilapidated remains of the Long Beach boardwalk. He eats his lunch in the same spot every Saturday, a tradition he and his friend started when the boardwalk was there.

“If it rains we don’t come here, we go somewhere else. I bet we’ve been doing this, how many years? Ten? Not bad,” Springer said.

Sunken into his beach chair, mounds of storm-surged sand, littered with glass chunks and splintered wood, block his view of the ocean. His lunch-haven certainly is not what it used to be.

The foundation of the boardwalk still stands, but all the wood and nails were torn off during the storm. Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

The foundation of the boardwalk still stands, but all the wood and nails were torn off during the storm.
Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

“It was almost hard to believe. I mean, look at that,” he said pointing to the sand trap. “Maybe I should volunteer and help them.”

It’s an all too common juxtaposition of normalcy and chaos but Springer illustrates the will of Sandy victims to return to simple routine.

“We still don’t know,” he said in between bites of romaine lettuce. “But it’s going to get better.”

What’s left of the Long Beach Boardwalk. Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

What’s left of the Long Beach Boardwalk.
Photo Credit: Amanda Salvucci

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